Horse of Jungle

Horse of Jungle

Horses' anatomy enables them to make use of speed to escape predators and they have a well-developed sense of balance and a strong fight-or-flight response. Related to this need to flee from predators in the wild is an unusual trait: horses are able to sleep both standing up and lying down. Female horses, called mares, carry their young for approximately 11 months, and a young horse, called a foal, can stand and run shortly following birth. Most domesticated horses begin training under saddle or in harness between the ages of two and four. They reach full adult development by age five, and have an average lifespan of between 25 and 30 years.

White Bear

White Bear

The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is a carnivorous bear whose native range lies largely within the Arctic Circle, encompassing the Arctic Ocean, its surrounding seas and surrounding land masses. It is a large bear, approximately the same size as the omnivorous Kodiak bear(Ursus arctos middendorffi).A boar (adult male) weighs around 350–700 kg (772–1,543 lb), while a sow (adult female) is about half that size. Although it is the sister species of the brown bear, it has evolved to occupy a narrower ecological niche, with many body characteristics adapted for cold temperatures, for moving across snow, ice, and open water, and for hunting seals, which make up most of its diet. Although most polar bears are born on land, they spend most of their time on the sea ice. Their scientific name means "maritimebear", and derives from this fact. Polar bears hunt their preferred food of seals from the edge of sea ice, often living off fat reserves when no sea ice is present. Because of their dependence on the sea ice, polar bears are classified as marine mammals.

Zerynthia Rumina

Zerynthia Rumina

Zerynthia rumina is an extremely striking species. Zerynthia rumina, also called Spanish Festoon or Westlicher Osterluzeifalter is a very charming butterfly from Palaearctic ecozone (Europe). The first description was in 1758 by Linnaeus. With a wingspan of 3.5 – 4.5 cm the Spanish Festoon is a small member of the family PAPILIONIDAE. The butterfly is yellow with black and red spots and a black sinuous line at the margin In south east France it can be confused with the southern festoon (Zerynthia polyxena). The two can be told apart by the presence of blue on the hindwing of the southern festoon. The Spanish festoon also has extensive red on the forewings.

Flamingo Under Water View

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Flamingo Under Water View



Flamingos usually stand on one leg while the other is tucked beneath their body. The reason for this behaviour is not fully understood. Recent research indicates that standing on one leg may allow the birds to conserve more body heat, given that they spend a significant amount of time wading in cold water.However, the behaviour also takes place in warm water. As well as standing in the water, flamingos may stamp their webbed feet in the mud to stir up food from the bottom

Wire Crested Thorntail

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Wire Crested Thorntail




The wire-crested thorntail is a hummingbird which occurs in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru.This species is one of the smallest birds on Earth, with a mature weight of around 2.5 g (0.088 oz). Males measure from 10.5 to 12 cm (4.1 to 4.7 in) in length, against the females' length of around 6.5 to 7.5 cm (2.6 to 3.0 in) long. The male of the eastern slopes of the northern Andes has elongated tail feathers that curve outward and taper from a broad base to a slender tip. The outermost is longest and each successive feather toward the center is shorter. All are steel-blue with white shafts, making a most striking and curious display when spread. The bird has a crest of brilliant green feathers.These birds feed on nectar from flowers using a long extendable tongue, or catch insects on the wing.They require frequent feeding while active during the day and become torpid at night to conserve energy.



Shark

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Shark

Sharks are a group of fish characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton, five to seven gill slits on the sides of the head, and pectoral fins that are not fused to the head. Modern sharks are classified within the clade Selachimorpha (or Selachii) and are the sister group to the rays. However, the term "shark" has also been used for extinct members of the subclass Elasmobranchii outside the Selachimorpha, such as Cladoselache and Xenacanthus, as well as other Chondrichthyes such as the holocephalid eugenedontidans. Under this broader definition, the earliest known sharks date back to more than 420 million years ago. Acanthodians are often referred to as "spiny sharks"; though they are not part of Chondrichthyes proper, they are a paraphyletic assemblage leading to cartilaginous fish as a whole.


Since then, sharks have diversified into over 500 species. They range in size from the small dwarf lanternshark (Etmopterus perryi), a deep sea species of only 17 centimetres (6.7 in) in length, to the whale shark (Rhincodon typus), the largest fish in the world, which reaches approximately 12 metres (40 ft) in length. Sharks are found in all seas and are common to depths of 2,000 metres (6,600 ft). They generally do not live in freshwater although there are a few known exceptions, such as the bull shark and the river shark, which can survive and be found in both seawater and freshwater. Sharks have a covering of dermal denticles that protects their skin from damage and parasites in addition to improving their fluid dynamics.

Sociable Weaver

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Sociable Weavers


The sociable weaver (Philetairus socius), also commonly known as the common social weaver, common social-weaver, and social weaver, is a species of bird in the Passeridae family endemic to Southern Africa. It is monotypic within the genus Philetairus. It is found in South Africa, Namibia, and Botswana. But their range is centered within the Northern Cape Province of South Africa .They build large compound community nests, a rarity among birds. These nests are perhaps the most spectacular structure built by any bird. In the southern range of the weaver's habitat; breeding may occur any time of the year and is closely linked to rainfall. In the northern range, discrete breeding season between Decembers to August has been noted.

Asian Paradise Flycatcher with Chicks

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Asian paradise flycatcher

The Asian paradise flycatcher, is a medium-sized passerine bird native to Asia that is widely distributed. As the global population is considered stable, it has been listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List since.The sexes are alike, but the juvenile is browner than the adult. The eye is brown and the bill and legs are black.
19–22 cm (7.5–8.7 in) long. Their heads are glossy black with a black crown and crest, their black bill round and sturdy, their eyes black. Female are rufous on the back with a greyish throat and underparts. Their wings are 86–92 mm (3.4–3.6 in) long. Young males look very much like females but have a black throat and blue-ringed eyes. As adults they develop up to 24 cm (9.4 in) long tail feathers with two central tail feathers growing up to 30 cm (12 in) long drooping streamers.
Young males are rufous and have short tails. They acquire long tails in their second or third year. Adult males are either predominantly bright rufous above or predominantly white. Some specimens show some degree of intermediacy between rufous and white. Long-tailed rufous birds are generally devoid of shaft streaks on the wing and tail feathers, while in white birds the shaft streaks, and sometimes the edges of the wing and tail feathers are black.

Golden horse or Akhal Teke


Golden horse or Akhal Teke



Source:The Akhal-Teke is a horse breed from Turkmenistan, where they are a national emblem. They have a reputation for speed and endurance, intelligence, and a distinctive metallic sheen. The shiny coat of palominos and buckskins led to their nickname "Golden Horses".  These horses are adapted to severe climatic conditions and are thought to be one of the oldest existing horse breeds.  There are currently about 6,600 Akhal-Tekes in the world, mostly in Turkmenistan and Russia, although they are also found throughout Europe and North America. Akhal was the name of the line of oases along the north slope of the Kopet Dag mountains. It was inhabited the Tekke tribe of Turkomans.

True white Horse

True white Horse
Source:Dominant white is best known for producing pink-skinned all-white horses with brown eyes, though some dominant white horses have residual pigment along the topline. Dominant white is, as the name implies, a genetically dominant color. At least one parent must be dominant white and it does not "skip" generations because it is not recessive. Nonetheless, new variations or mutations producing dominant white do occur spontaneously from time to time.

Angle Sabino White Horse

Angle Sabino White Horse

source: White horses have unpigmented skin and a white hair coat. Many white horses have dark eyes, though some have blue eyes. In contrast to gray horses which are born with pigmented skin they keep for life and pigmented hair that lightens to white with age, truly white horses are born with white hair and mostly pink, unpigmented skin. Some white horses are born with partial pigmentation in their skin and hair, which may or may not be retained as they mature, but when a white horse lightens, both skin and hair lose pigmentation. In contrast, grays retain skin pigment and only the hair becomes white.

Dominant White Horse

Dominant white Horse

Source:White horses are born white and stay white throughout their lives. White horses may have brown, blue, or hazel eyes. "True white" horses, especially those that carry one of the dominant white (W) genes, are rare. Most horses that are commonly referred to as "white" are actually "gray" horses whose hair coats are completely white.